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On Resurrection Day, the sun and moon are released from service:
and the eye beholds the Source of their radiance,
then it discerns the permanent possession from the loan,
and this passing caravan from the abiding home.
If for a while a wet nurse is needed,
Mother, return us to your breast.
I don’t want a nurse; my Mother is more fair.
I am like Moses whose nurse and Mother were the same. – See more at: http://www.adishakti.org/_/centrality_of_the_divine_feminine_in_sufism.htm#sthash.eB3aFCcU.dpuf
On Resurrection Day, the sun and moon are released from service:
and the eye beholds the Source of their radiance,
then it discerns the permanent possession from the loan,
and this passing caravan from the abiding home.
If for a while a wet nurse is needed,
Mother, return us to your breast.
I don’t want a nurse; my Mother is more fair.
I am like Moses whose nurse and Mother were the same. – See more at: http://www.adishakti.org/_/centrality_of_the_divine_feminine_in_sufism.htm#sthash.eB3aFCcU.dpuf

On Resurrection Day, the sun and the moon are released from service:

and the eye beholds the Source of their radiance,

then it discerns the permanent possession from the loan,

and this passing caravan from the abiding home.

If for a while a wet nurse is needed,

Mother, return us to your breast.

I don’t want a nurse, my Mother is more fair.

I am like Moses whose nurse and Mother were the same.

(From the Mathnavi, Verse 701)

mother_and_child

I have had a fascination with Islam since my freshman year of high school. At one point, I even stated the Shahadah within the confines of my home at one point when I became worried that if I did not, I might die and not go to al-Jannah (Paradise). Of course, my swift decision to convert did not last long as I felt overwhelmed by the huge number of lifestyle and ideological changes I would have to make in order to be a proper Muslim, and so I collapsed spiritually. I am still not sure how I feel about this event in my life, as I always hear stories of Muslim converts who are very happy with their change in religion. But while I myself am not currently a Muslim, I still have a great deal of respect for the religion and its practitioners.

I will note here that I am not speaking for orthodox Islam, much as my articles on the Virgin Mary do not speak for orthodox Christianity. Unlike many other websites I have come across during my research, I will not attempt to say that “Muslims believe in a Moon Goddess called Fatima” or other such nonsense, because I know enough about Islam to know that this is not true. Rather, this article is a very brief look at literature and symbolism regarding the Divine Feminine in Arabic/Islamic history, and is intended primarily for those who have an interest in the topic or Pagans who incorporate Arabic traditions into their worship.

saghism-Every day, Muslims around the world recite the Al Fatiha (the first surah of the Qu’ran) during salat (prayer). The following invocation said at the beginning of prayer is known as the basmala and is transliterated as:

Bismillah al-Rahman al-Rahim

In the Name of Allah, the Most Compassionate, the Most Merciful

Both the names al-Rahman and al-Raheem stem from the same root word, rahm, which means “womb”. We can think of this in the sense that Allah is the Creator of the Universe, and thus comparing Allah to the feminine symbolism of a womb carries rich metaphysical meaning. Al-Hakim (The Wise) is another feminine Name of Allah. This Name has parallels to the Divine Feminine incarnation of Wisdom in Gnostic Christianity, Sophia.

-An interpretation of the niqab from an esoteric, Divine Feminine perspective is given by Mr. Philemon below:

The Sufis use the term Wajh or “face” as a name for the the Divine Essence. The veil worn by women is thus symbolic in esoteric Islam of the veil that covers the face of God, the Divine Essence.

It is also worth taking note that the holiest building in Islam, the Kaaba, is also covered with a veiling shroud called the kiswah.

niqab-To illustrate Allah’s mercy for a sinful humanity, the Prophet Muhammad used the example of the Mother in the following hadith from Al-Bukhari:

After a battle, the Prophet and his Companions came upon a group of women and children. One woman had lost her child and was going around looking for him, her breasts flowing with milk. When she found her child, she joyfully put him to her breast and nursed him. The Prophet asked his Companions, “Do you think that this woman could throw her son in the fire?” They answered “No.” He then said: “Allah is more merciful to His servants than this woman to her son.”

-During the Miraj (Muhammad’s ascension into Heaven), Muhammad is escorted by the archangel Gabriel (a masculine force), but the vehicle upon which he rides was a feminine creature known as the buraq, which has the body of a white winged horse and the face of a woman.

Al-Buraf_Hafifa-A story told by Islamic historian Ibn Ishaq in his work Sirat Rasul Allah, the first biography of Prophet Muhammad ever written, narrates the following regarding the conquest of Mecca and the destruction of the Kabba’s idols:

“The apostle (Muhammad) entered Mecca (Kabba) on the day of the conquest it contained 360 idols which Iblis (the devil) had strengthened with lead. The apostle was standing by them with a stick in his hand, saying, “The truth has come and falsehood has passed away; verily falsehood is sure to pass away” (Qur’an 17:82). Then he pointed at them with his stick and they collapsed on their backs one after the other…The Quraysh (Meccan polytheist) had put pictures in the Kabba including two of Jesus son of Mary and Mary…The apostle ordered that the pictures should be erased except those of Jesus and Mary.”

While many later aniconist Muslims claim that this hadith is weak and unreliable, disputes exist within the Islamic community regarding various matters and contradictions occur even in the Qu’ran itself. I believe that if this hadith is true, it is fruit for thought that the Prophet Muhammad would choose to salvage an image of the Mother and child.

Persian, Jesus and Mary, 1600Resources:

http://archive.org/details/IbnIshaq-SiratRasulAllah-translatorA.Guillaume

http://www.free-minds.org/al-rahman-al-raheem-most-important-pair

http://seekersguidance.org/blog/2009/11/al-rahman/

http://eternalfeminine.wikispaces.com/Exoteric+and+Esoteric

http://www.adishakti.org/_/centrality_of_the_divine_feminine_in_sufism.htm

http://adishakti.org/_/goddess_remains_the_esoteric_heartbeat_of_islam.htm

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